Industrial and Applied Mathematics Seminar

Please note that the list below only shows forthcoming events, which may not include regular events that have not yet been entered for the forthcoming term. Please see the past events page for a list of all seminar series that the department has on offer.

Past events in this series
23 November 2017
16:00
Matthew Butler
Abstract

Many species of insects adhere to vertical and inverted surfaces using footpads that secrete thin films of a mediating fluid. The fluid bridges the gap between the foot and the target surface. The precise role of this liquid is still subject to debate, but it is thought that the contribution of surface tension to the adhesive force may be significant. It is also known that the footpad is soft, suggesting that capillary forces might deform its surface. Inspired by these physical ingredients, we study a model problem in which a thin, deformable membrane under tension is adhered to a flat, rigid surface by a liquid droplet. We find that there can be multiple possible equilibrium states, with the number depending on the applied tension and aspect ratio of the system. The presence of elastic deformation  ignificantly enhances the adhesion force compared to a rigid footpad. A mathematical model shows that the equilibria of the system can be controlled via two key parameters depending on the imposed separation of the foot and target surface, and the tension applied to the membrane. We confirm this finding experimentally and show that the system may transition rapidly between two states as the two parameters are varied. This suggests that different strategies may be used to adhere strongly and then detach quickly.

  • Industrial and Applied Mathematics Seminar
23 November 2017
16:30
Alexander Bradley
Abstract

It is thought that the hairy legs of water walking arthropods are able to remain clean and dry because the flexibility of the hairs spontaneously moves drops off the hairs. We present a mathematical model of this bending-induced motion, or bendotaxis, and study how it performs for wetting and non-wetting drops. Crucially, we show that both wetting and non-wetting droplets move in the same direction (using physical arguments and numerical solutions). This suggests that a surface covered in elastic filaments (such as the hairy leg of insects) may be able to universally self-clean. To quantify the efficiency of this effect, we explore the conditions under which drops leave the structure by ‘spreading’ rather than translating and also how long it takes to do so.

  • Industrial and Applied Mathematics Seminar
7 December 2017
16:00
to
17:30
Yuli Chashechkin
Abstract

We observed and measured the impact and secondary oscillating bubble sounds, capillary waves produced by small impact droplets of the surface of submerging drop and picturesque filament and grid structures produced by coloured drop on the surface of the cavity and crown. Physical model includes discussion of  the potential surface energy effects.

  • Industrial and Applied Mathematics Seminar
1 February 2018
16:00
to
17:30
Renaud Lambiotte
Abstract

In this talk, I will present some recent results exploring the connections between dynamical systems and network science. I will particularly focus on large-scale structures and their dynamical interpretation. Those may correspond to communities/clusters or classes of dynamically equivalent nodes. If time allows, I will also present results where the underlying network structure is unknown and where communities are directly inferred from time series observed on the nodes.

 

  • Industrial and Applied Mathematics Seminar

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