Forthcoming Seminars

Please note that the list below only shows forthcoming events, which may not include regular events that have not yet been entered for the forthcoming term. Please see the past events page for a list of all seminar series that the department has on offer.

Past events in this series
Tomorrow
14:15
DMITRY BELYAEV
Abstract

Smooth Gaussian functions appear naturally in many areas of mathematics. Most of the talk will be about two special cases: the random plane model and the Bargmann-Fock ensemble. Random plane wave are conjectured to be a universal model for high-energy eigenfunctions of the Laplace operator in a generic domain. The Bargmann-Fock ensemble appears in quantum mechanics and is the scaling limit of the Kostlan ensemble, which is a good model for a `typical' projective variety. It is believed that these models, despite very different origins have something in common: they have scaling limits that are described be the critical percolation model. This ties together ideas and methods from many different areas of mathematics: probability, analysis on manifolds, partial differential equation, projective geometry, number theory and mathematical physics. In the talk I will introduce all these models, explain the conjectures relating them, and will talk about recent progress in understanding these conjectures.

  • Stochastic Analysis Seminar
Tomorrow
14:15
Brent Doran
Abstract

 The basic algebra-geometry dictionary for finitely generated k-algebras is one of the triumphs of 19th and early 20th century mathematics.  However, classes of related rings, such as their k-subalgebras, lack clean general properties or organizing principles, even when they arise naturally in problems of smooth projective geometry.  “Stabilization” in smooth topology and symplectic geometry, achieved by products with Euclidean space, substantially simplifies many
problems.  We discuss an analog in the more rigid setting of algebraic and arithmetic geometry, which, among other things (e.g., applications to counting rational points), gives some structure to the study of k-subalgebras.  We focus on the case of the moduli space of stable rational n-pointed curves to illustrate.

 

  • Geometry and Analysis Seminar
Tomorrow
15:45
Martin Bridson
Abstract

Developments in geometry and low dimensional topology have given renewed vigour to the following classical question: to what extent do the finite images of a finitely presented group determine the group? I'll survey what we know about this question in the context of 3-manifolds, and I shall present recent joint work with McReynolds, Reid and Spitler showing that the fundamental groups of certain hyperbolic orbifolds are distingusihed from all other finitely generated groups by their finite quotients.

Tomorrow
16:00
Abstract

Existence results in large for fully non-linear compressible multi-fluid models are in the mathematical literature in a short supply (if not non-existing). In this talk, we shall recall the main ideas of Lions' proof of the existence of weak solutions to the compressible (mono-fluid) Navier-Stokes equations in the barotropic regime. We shall then eplain how this approach can be adapted to the construction of weak solutions to some simple multi-fluid models. The main tools in the proofs are renormalization techniques for the continuity and transport equations. They will be discussed in more detail.

  • Partial Differential Equations Seminar
23 January 2018
12:00
to
13:15
Eduardo Casali
Abstract

We study the winding mode sector of recently discovered string theories, which were, until now, believed to describe only conventional field theories in target space. We discover that upon compactification winding modes allows the string to acquire an oscillator spectrum giving rise to an infinite tower of massive higher-spin modes. We study the spectra, S-matrices, T-duality and high-energy behaviour of the bosonic and supersymmetric models. In the tensionless limit, we obtain formulae for amplitudes based on the scattering equations. The windings decouple from the scattering equations but remain in the integrands. The existence of this winding sector shows that these new theories do have stringy aspects and describe non-conventional field theories.  This talk is based on https://arxiv.org/abs/1710.01241.

23 January 2018
12:00
Anton Pichler
Abstract

Systemic risk arises as a multi-layer network phenomenon. Layers represent direct financial exposures of various types, including interbank liabilities, derivative or foreign exchange exposures. Another network layer of systemic risk emerges through common asset holdings of financial institutions. Strongly overlapping portfolios lead to similar exposures that are caused by price movements of the underlying financial assets. Based on the knowledge of portfolio holdings of financial agents we quantify systemic risk of overlapping portfolios. We present an optimization procedure, where we minimize the systemic risk in a given financial market by optimally rearranging overlapping portfolio networks, under the constraints that the expected returns and risks of the individual portfolios are unchanged. We explicitly demonstrate the power of the method on the overlapping portfolio network of sovereign exposure between major European banks by using data from the European Banking Authority stress test of 2016. We show that systemic-risk-efficient allocations are accessible by the optimization. In the case of sovereign exposure, systemic risk can be reduced by more than a factor of two, without any detrimental effects for the individual banks. These results are confirmed by a simple simulation of fire sales in the government bond market. In particular we show that the contagion probability is reduced dramatically in the optimized network.
 

23 January 2018
12:45
Helen Fletcher
Abstract

We are all familiar with the need for continuum mechanics-based models in physical applications. In this case, we are interested in large-scale water-wave problems, such as coastal flows and dam breaks.
When modelling these problems, we inevitably wish to solve them on a finite domain, and require boundary conditions to do so. Ideally, we would recreate the semi-infinite nature of a coastline by allowing any generated waves to flow out of the domain, as opposed to them reflecting off the far-field boundary and disrupting the remainder of our simulation. However, applying an appropriate boundary condition is not as straightforward as we might think.
In this talk, we aim to evaluate alternatives to so-called 'active boundary condition' absorption. We will derive a toy model of a shallow-water wavetank, and consider the implementation and efficacy of two 'passive' absorption techniques.
 

  • Junior Applied Mathematics Seminar
23 January 2018
14:00
Ellya Kawecki
Abstract

We introduce a discontinuous Galerkin finite element method (DGFEM) for Hamilton–Jacobi–Bellman equations on piecewise curved domains, and prove that the method is consistent, stable, and produces optimal convergence rates. Upon utilising a long standing result due to N. Krylov, we may characterise the Monge–Ampère equation as a HJB equation; in two dimensions, this HJB equation can be characterised further as uniformly elliptic HJB equation, allowing for the application of the DGFEM

  • Numerical Analysis Group Internal Seminar
23 January 2018
14:15
Alexander Stasinski
Abstract

Let $F$ be a non-Archimedean local field with ring of integers $\mathcal O$ and maximal ideal $\mathfrak p$. T. Shintani and G. Hill independently introduced a large class of smooth representations of $GL_N(\mathcal O)$, called regular representations. Roughly speaking they correspond to elements in the Lie algebra $M_N(\mathcal O)$ which are regular mod $\mathfrak p$ (i.e, having centraliser of dimension $N$). The study of regular representations of $GL_N(\mathcal O)$ goes back to Shintani in the 1960s, and independently and later, Hill, who both constructed the regular representations with even conductor, but left the much harder case of odd conductor open. In recent simultaneous and independent work, Krakovski, Onn and Singla gave a construction of the regular representations of $GL_N(\mathcal O)$ when the residue characteristic of $\mathcal O$ is not $2$.

In this talk I will present a complete construction of all the regular representations of $GL_N(\mathcal O)$. The approach is analogous to, and motivated by, the construction of supercuspidal representations of $GL_N(F)$ due to Bushnell and Kutzko. This is joint work with Shaun Stevens.
 

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