News

Monday, 29 January 2018

Ursula Martin and Ian Griffiths awarded an MPLS Impact Award

Prof. Ursula Martin and Dr Ian Griffiths have each been awarded an MPLS Impact Award for 2017-18. The MPLS (Mathematical, Physical, Engineering and Life Sciences Division at the University of Oxford) Impact Awards scheme aims to foster and raise awareness of impact by rewarding it at a local level.

Ursula's award is for Public Engagement in connection with the 2015 celebrations of the 200th anniversary of Ada Lovelace's birth. This included exhibits at many museums (including the National Museum of  Computing, Bletchley Park, the Science Museum and the Computer History Museum in Silicon Valley) as well as an issue of a children's computing magazine developed in collaboration with QMUL (Queen Mary University of London) and distributed to UK schools to encourage programming.

Ian's award is for Non-Commercial Impact, and is in recognition of his work with researchers at IIT Kharagpur on the modelling and improvement of filters to remove arsenic from water supplies in India. This work is funded by GCRF (the UK Global Challenge Research Fund) and also supported by UNICEF which is now installing community-scale filters in India. Although it falls outside the definition of the category, Ian is also working with three companies (Dyson, Gore and Pall Corporation) to improve their filters for various purposes.

These awards, which include a £1000 payment, will be presented at the MPLS Winter Reception on February 6th.

Thursday, 11 January 2018

Oxford Mathematician Sarah Waters awarded a Leverhulme Trust Senior Research Fellowship

Oxford Mathematician Sarah Waters has been awarded a Royal Society Leverhulme Trust Senior Research Fellowship commencing this month. Sarah is an applied mathematician here in Oxford. Her interest is in physiological fluid mechanics, tissue biomechanics and the application of mathematics to problems in medicine and biology. Her work varies from classical applied mathematics problems motivated by physiological applications to highly interdisciplinary work - she collaborates with life scientists, clinicians, bioengineers, theoreticians and experimentalists to develop and solve models that are novel, realistic and provide insights into biomedical problems. The resulting models often lead to theoretical predictions that can be exploited in the laboratory.

Friday, 10 November 2017

James Maynard appointed Research Professor and receives a Wolfson Merit Award from the Royal Society

Oxford Mathematician James Maynard has been appointed Research Professor and receives a Wolfson Merit Award from the Royal Society. The Royal Society Wolfson Merit Award is a prestigious award intended to attract or retain respected scientists of outstanding achievement and potential.

Professor Maynard's project, 'Structure in the primes, with applications', aims to develop techniques to understand the statistical properties of the distribution of prime numbers - a central problem in number theory. The project consists of three large projects to be investigated over a five-year period. The projects follow the common theme of studying classical problems in analytic number theory by attempting to classify counter-examples, should they exist. This approach has been remarkably successful in analytic arguments, and is an example of a common connection between analysis, combinatorics and algebra. The underlying techniques also provide flexible and universal means of answering rigorously many real-world questions about primes.

James Maynard is one of the brightest young stars in world mathematics at the moment, having made dramatic advances in analytic number theory in the years immediately following his 2013 doctorate. These advances have brought him worldwide attention in mathematics and beyond. Just 30, he has already gained many markers of distinction, including the European Mathematical Society Prize, the Ramanujan Prize and the Whitehead Prize. He will be an invited speaker at the quadrennial International Congress of Mathematicians in 2018. He also holds a Clay Research Fellowship (2013-18), the most prestigious early career position in world mathematics.

Thursday, 19 October 2017

Dominic Vella wins Philip Leverhulme Prize

Oxford Mathematician Dominic Vella has won one of this year's prestigious Philip Leverhulme Prizes. The award recognises the achievement of outstanding researchers whose work has already attracted international recognition and whose future career is exceptionally promising.

Dominic's research is concerned with various aspects of solid and fluid mechanics in general but with particular focus on the wrinkling of thin elastic objects and surface tension effects. You can see him discussing his work here.

Tuesday, 3 October 2017

Per-Gunnar Martinsson awarded the 2017 Germund Dahlquist Prize

Oxford Mathematician Per-Gunnar Martinsson has been awarded the 2017 Germund Dahlquist Prize by the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics. The Germund Dahlquist Prize is awarded for original contributions to fields associated with Germund Dahlquist, especially the numerical solution of differential equations and numerical methods for scientific computing.

The prize honors Martinsson for fundamental contributions to numerical analysis and scientific computing that are making a significant impact in data science applications. Specific contributions include his development of linear time algorithms for dense matrix operations related to multidimensional elliptic PDEs and integral equations; and he has made deep and innovative contributions to the development of probabilistic algorithms for the rapid solution of certain classes of large-scale linear algebra problems. 
 
Per-Gunnar is currently Professor of Numerical Analysis at the University of Oxford. Hear more from him in this Q & A.

Wednesday, 16 August 2017

Oxford Mathematician Ulrike Tillmann elected to Royal Society Council

Oxford Mathematician Ulrike Tillmann FRS has been elected a member of the Council of the Royal Society. The Council consists of between 20 and 24 Fellows and is chaired by the President.

Founded in the 1660s, the Royal Society’s fundamental purpose is to recognise, promote, and support excellence in science and to encourage the development and use of science for the benefit of humanity. The Royal Society's motto 'Nullius in verba' is taken to mean 'take nobody's word for it'. 

Ulrike specialises in algebraic topology and has made important contributions to the study of the moduli space of algebraic curves.

Wednesday, 19 July 2017

NIck Trefethen wins George Pólya Prize for Mathematical Exposition

Ocford Mathematician Nick Trefethen FRS has been awarded the George Pólya Prize for Mathematical Exposition by the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) "for the exceptionally well-expressed accumulated insights found in his books, papers, essays, and talks... His enthusiastic approach to his subject, his leadership, and his delight at the enlightenment achieved are unique and inspirational, motivating others to learn and do applied mathematics through the practical combination of deep analysis and algorithmic dexterity."

Nick is Professor of Numerical Analysis and Head of the Numerical Analysis Group here in Oxford. 

Monday, 10 July 2017

Oxford Mathematicians win outstanding certificate as part of the new IIF Tao Hong Award

Oxford Mathematicians Stephen Haben and Peter Grindrod and colleagues have won an outstanding certificate as part of the new IIF Tao Hong Award for papers in energy forecasting published in the International Journal of Forecasting.

The paper, 'A new error measure for forecasts of household-level, high resolution electrical energy consumption,' provides high-quality verification tools for load forecasts, which are essential in managing power systems. This is particularly helpful for work on demand profiling in the residential sector, where the temporal resolution of data has increased rapidly in recent years.

Thursday, 6 July 2017

Alex Wilkie and Alison Etheridge win LMS Prizes

Congratulations to the Oxford Mathematicians who have just been awarded LMS prizes. Alex Wilkie receives the Pólya Prize for his profound contributions to model theory and to its connections with real analytic geometry and Alison Etheridge receives the Senior Anne Bennett Prize in recognition of her outstanding research on measure-valued stochastic processes and applications to population biology; and for her impressive leadership and service to the profession.

Saturday, 17 June 2017

Oxford Mathematician Alison Etheridge awarded an OBE

Oxford Mathematician Alison Etheridge FRS has been awarded an OBE in the Queen's Birthday Honours List for Services to Science. Alison is Professor of Probability in Oxford and will take up the Presidency of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics in August 2017.

Alison's research has a particular focus on mathematical models of population genetics, where she has been involved in efforts to understand the effects of spatial structure of populations on their patterns of genetic variation. She recently gave an Oxford Mathematics Public Lecture on the mathematical modelling of genes.

Pages